Posts Tagged ‘#writersblock’

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As I found myself typing some of the final chapters of my latest novel, I noticed something that I never had before. I was experiencing a unique type of what Steven Pressfield would classify as “resistance”.

Now don’t get me wrong, I don’t think that there is a writer out there who hasn’t experienced “resistance” in one way, shape, or form; the most common forms being procrastination, self-sabotage, and the dreaded (somewhat generic and all-encompassing) writer’s block. We all have been guilty of checking emails, or browsing social media when we could actually be throwing down some words on the page and occasionally, we may find ourselves wanting to write only to find that our creative wells are in need of filling.

The type of resistance that I found myself contending with was simply NOT WANTING TO FINISH THE BOOK! Now, I had heard of some writers having a bit of post-project depression when they are trying to decide what their next project is going to be, but this was something new for me altogether.

If, anything I have more projects than I do time, so when one is completed and I still have words to type to meet my daily goals (currently 1500-2000 words a day depending on work and family commitments) it’s on to the next story I go.

I think the best way to describe the feeling that I was having while nearing the end of the project was like coming to the end of a binge-worthy Netflix series, I wanted to finish it, but just didn’t want it to be over. The only reason that I could think of this project being any different from any of my past ones is that save for maybe one, (my novelette, Not Only the Dead) it is the most personal.

It was because of these feelings of personal attachment that toward the end of the novel, I found myself consulting my mental checklist almost as much as I was writing. This feeling was one that I was more familiar with, because regardless of the level of attachment I feel to a project I try to check all of the open story arcs in the earlier sections of the book/story/screenplay and make sure that they are either effectively resolved or that every bit of them are removed from the manuscript so as not to leave any loose ends.

Some people use whiteboards or computer programs for stuff like this, but I prefer to keep them all jumbled and quasi-organized in my head, so that I have an excuse to act brain-dead for the last two weeks of any project.

Is there a better way?

Sure, but I still manage to get the job done.

So with all that being said…

I have a confession, faithful readers   —

I still have one chapter and a prologue to write before I can wrap up The Artist and the Carpenter.

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See how this particularly annoying form of resistance works? I ended up writing a blog instead of wrapping the project! Either way I hope that you enjoyed my little “creative detour”.

 

Until next time, faithful readers!

Hello everyone,

I was terrified to realize that it had been nearly two months since I last posted to Horrors of the Horror Business (HOTHB). I wish I could say that I was far away, without computer access, or that Stephen King and Neil Gaiman invited me to a secret writing camp deep in the heart of Transylvania. Of course, none of these things were the cause of my absence; in fact I was barely aware of my being absent. With a re-write of my most recent screenplay, the busy season at my day-job, as well of the constant blessing and obligation of family and friends I was living my life in a blur.

Many great artists have their own take on writer’s block, some think it can be debilitating, others think that it is no more than a myth. I have to say that I fall into the later category; but somehow I allowed my HOTHB content to be blocked! I have been putting words on the page but my poor wordpress account has been left alone in the cold.

Included are a couple of links for overcoming writer’s block in all of its devious forms. http://grammar.about.com/od/yourwriting/a/wblockquotes.htm

http://www.stevenpressfield.com/the-war-of-art/

And of course some advice from Neil Gaiman!

Until next time Horror Fans!

Jim